You should all know by now that I love anything even remotely related to a heat pad! It's one of the most comforting feelings when you have any type of chronic pain and I've found it a great relief for my endometriosis and fibromyalgia pain. The good thing about heat, is that you can use it alongside any regular medication or therapy without it affecting those things.

I was contacted by Healthyline to discuss not only their heat products, but also how they incorporate Far Infrared Rays (FIR), Pulsed Electromagnetic Field (PEMF) therapy, negative ions, photon light, hot stone and magnetic therapy in to them... And to offer you a cheeky 10% discount too!

Healthyline manufacture the world's largest selection of heated natural gemstone therapy mats. Starting out in 2013 in New York (USA), Healthyline began as a collaboration between doctors, inventors, lawyers and entrepreneurs and quickly became an industry leader. They now work closely alongside doctors, acupuncturists, reiki masters, professional spas, wellness centres, holistic practitioners and more.

In addition to mats, Healthyline also offer heated knee pads, shoulder pads, pillows and energy bedding. These products not only offer infra-red technology but also have the added benefits of negative ions and PEMF therapy. You can view Healthyline's full range of products here or their (.PDF) brochure here.


Healthyline's gemstone heat therapy mats are designed to facilitate proper functioning of the heat of a traditional heating pad and utilises gemstones to channel deep penetrating natural therapies that work together to provide one comprehensive experience, stimulating advanced natural healing of the body, leading to an increase in overall general well-being.

Without the incorporation of natural gemstones, you would not receive the benefits of FIR or negative ions. Healthyline make many different models that include different variations of stones. Some consist of one stone, some a combination of two and then some use three or more. The more stones included in your model, the greater the range of benefits.

:: Amethyst is a natural conductor of FIR and negative ions. It is known to have calming and stress-reducing effects that make it ideal for meditation and calming practices. Amethyst has been known to enhance the body's ability to help with sleeping troubles, undergo detoxification and boost cell regeneration.

:: Jade is made up of two components: jadeite and nephrite. Jade is a natural conductor of FIR and negative ions and is known to amplify the effects of other stones around it. It helps the body function more efficiently by restoring your energy and emits a low heat that is good for relaxation and meditation. Jade is often used as a treatment for kidney illnesses.

:: Tourmaline is said to be a magical stone that protects those who covet its powers. It is known to help detoxify tissue and body systems. It emits FIR and produces the highest amount of negative ions out of all the gemstones Healthyline use. Tourmaline helps to revitalise the mind and body, speed up your healing functions, and aid in the regeneration of bone tissue.

:: Obsidian doesn't produce FIR or negative ions but is a healing stone. The jet black colour of the stone is believed to draw all negativity to it, both physically and mentally, protecting the user from any harm. Obsidian is a very powerful support gemstone, amplifying the effects of other stones around it.


Healthyline combine several different therapies in each of their products:

FIR (Far Infrared Rays)
FIR are invisible waves of energy that have the ability to penetrate all layers of the human body; deep in to tissues, muscles and bone. FIR are on the opposite side of the spectrum to harmful ultraviolet rays.

The sun, our bodies and our hands are always emitting FIR. In the past, this discovery lead to healing methods like palm healing. This has evolved in to what is now known as Reiki, a form of healing that utilises the heat from the palms of the hands to assist in the body's natural healing process. Science has been able to focus the healing component of FIR and utilise these rays to improve our natural healing abilities.

FIR
:: control muscle and joint pain
:: detoxify your body
:: reduce pain and stiffness
:: relieve back pain symptoms
:: help chronic fatigue
:: improve quality of life and overall well-being
:: reduce blood pressure levels
:: treat some forms of cancer
:: lower side effects of diabetes
:: improve motor functions
:: prevent sunburn
:: treat arteriovenous fistula
:: treat allergic rhinitis
 
Further reading:

PEMF (Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy)
PEMF, also known as Low Field Magnetic Stimulation (LFMS), uses electromagnetic fields in an attempt to enhance your body's overall functioning as well as improving blood circulation, reducing chronic pain, promoting bone healing, alleviating symptoms of arthritis, treating symptoms of depression, increasing range of motion, and more.

The process of receiving PEMF involves sending energy waves towards damaged and injured areas of the body. The waves pass through the injured areas and increase the spin of the electrons within them. As a result, the cell's potential is restored and improved healing can take place.

PEMF
:: relieves pain
:: improves blood circulation
:: helps with arthritis
:: relieves the symptoms of depression
:: treats migraines
:: promotes bone healing
:: decreases diabetic factors
:: induces nerve repair
:: increases range of motion

Further reading:

Negative Ions
Ions are invisible charged particles in the air - either molecules or atoms, which bear an electric charge. Some particles are positively charged and some are negatively charged. Positive ions are molecules that have lost one or more electrons, whereas negative ions are actually oxygen atoms with extra negatively charged electrons.

Negative ions are abundant in nature, especially around waterfalls, by the sea, after a storm, in mountains and forests. The highest concentration of positive ions can be found in polluted cities, crowded areas and in confined spaces such as offices, industrial areas, schools and cars.

Negative ions are beneficial for the human body and are scientifically tied to a lot of health benefits, whereas positive ions are harmful.

Further reading:

Photon Light Therapy
Different body tissues absorb energy from different wavelengths of light energy. Unlike FIR, photon light therapy has a shorter wavelength so it doesn't penetrate as deeply. Photon therapy uses visible red lights at a wavelength of 660 nanometers.

Photon light requires direct exposure to the skin in order for it's full effects to be received. When the photon light is absorbed by the body, it forms in to nitric oxide. This stimulates synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) which is essential for the metabolism of all cellular regeneration.

Photon light therapy assists directly with the mitochondria, the part of the cell responsible for generating proteins and collagen. The new cells are able to destroy old cells, assisting even further with detoxification.

Photon light therapy 
:: treats depression
:: improves motor function and nerve regeneration
:: promotes better wound healing
:: improves skin and acne


Hot stone therapy
Tourmaline, jade and amethyst are natural conductors of FIR and negative ions when they are activated by the heating technology. While you get all the typical healing experiences associated with hot stone therapy, these benefits are greatly amplified by the combination of these gemstones.

Magnetic Therapy


Magnetic therapy is a science focused on maintaining the body's proper electromagnetic field to promote healing.

When a magnet is placed on the body, it promotes increased blood circulation. This increased blood flow helps to deliver more nutrients to your body and flush out toxins and contaminants. The magnet also relaxes the surrounding muscles and tissues, enabling your body to heal more efficiently.

Magnets offer a natural form of pain relief that can be used as frequently as required with no side effects.

Magnetic therapy
:: is a natural pain reliever
:: reduces swelling
:: promotes healing after injury or surgery
:: reduces the symptoms of osteoarthritis
:: helps general well-being


Healthyline's products can help with the following health issues:

:: Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis
FIR stimulates the circulatory system, promoting increased oxygenation throughout the body. FIR can also help create white blood cells which improve your immune system and overall wellness. You may also find a decrease in stiffness and stress.

Negative ions focus on the respiratory system and detoxification. They can help improve mood levels and generate more serotonin in the brain to facilitate sleep. Negative ions can help restore energy levels and help the body function more efficiently.

PEMF initiates cellular revitalisation and helps maintain proper healing functions throughout the body. PEMF can alleviate painful symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and increase the range of motion, reduce muscle spasms and neck pain in osteoarthritis patients.

:: Chronic fatigue syndrome
FIR can improve your sleep, reduce sleep disturbances and minimise aches and pains associated with chronic fatigue syndrome. FIR can also help create white blood cells which improve your immune system and overall wellness.

Negative ions focus on the respiratory system and detoxification. They can help improve mood levels, generate more serotonin in the brain to facilitate sleep and restore energy levels.

:: Sleep conditions
Magnetic therapy improves blood circulation. This helps to deliver more nutrients to your body and flush out toxins and contaminants. Magnetic therapy also relaxes muscles and tissue. The process stimulates melatonin in your brain, the hormone responsible for regulating sleep.

FIR and negative ions increase blood flow, promoting oxygenation that improves blood pressure and the immune system.

Negative ions will also improve your state of mind as a result of detoxification and increased serotonin levels.

:: Fibromyalgia
FIR and negative ions influence aspects of the body that are altered by fibromyalgia.

PEMF can help those with fibromyalgia recover some of their body's natural ability to manage it's pain and relieve muscle tension.

Photon light therapy aids fibromyalgia sufferers as it can relieve neuropathic pain and strengthen the immune system to help the body improve it's wellness. Fibromyalgia sufferers might notice a decrease in fibro-fog, a reduction in tense muscles, increased ability to get to sleep and a reduction in overall pain and swelling.

:: ... And many more.


If you are interested in any of Healthyline's products, then you can view their full range in their online store.

Healthyline have also, very kindly, offered a 10% discount to you all. Just visit their online store and enter the code above at checkout!

If you would like any further information, you can find Healthyline on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Youtube.

S.

Healthyline heated natural gemstone therapy mats


You should all know by now that I love anything even remotely related to a heat pad! It's one of the most comforting feelings when you have any type of chronic pain and I've found it a great relief for my endometriosis and fibromyalgia pain. The good thing about heat, is that you can use it alongside any regular medication or therapy without it affecting those things.

I was contacted by Healthyline to discuss not only their heat products, but also how they incorporate Far Infrared Rays (FIR), Pulsed Electromagnetic Field (PEMF) therapy, negative ions, photon light, hot stone and magnetic therapy in to them... And to offer you a cheeky 10% discount too!

Healthyline manufacture the world's largest selection of heated natural gemstone therapy mats. Starting out in 2013 in New York (USA), Healthyline began as a collaboration between doctors, inventors, lawyers and entrepreneurs and quickly became an industry leader. They now work closely alongside doctors, acupuncturists, reiki masters, professional spas, wellness centres, holistic practitioners and more.

In addition to mats, Healthyline also offer heated knee pads, shoulder pads, pillows and energy bedding. These products not only offer infra-red technology but also have the added benefits of negative ions and PEMF therapy. You can view Healthyline's full range of products here or their (.PDF) brochure here.


Healthyline's gemstone heat therapy mats are designed to facilitate proper functioning of the heat of a traditional heating pad and utilises gemstones to channel deep penetrating natural therapies that work together to provide one comprehensive experience, stimulating advanced natural healing of the body, leading to an increase in overall general well-being.

Without the incorporation of natural gemstones, you would not receive the benefits of FIR or negative ions. Healthyline make many different models that include different variations of stones. Some consist of one stone, some a combination of two and then some use three or more. The more stones included in your model, the greater the range of benefits.

:: Amethyst is a natural conductor of FIR and negative ions. It is known to have calming and stress-reducing effects that make it ideal for meditation and calming practices. Amethyst has been known to enhance the body's ability to help with sleeping troubles, undergo detoxification and boost cell regeneration.

:: Jade is made up of two components: jadeite and nephrite. Jade is a natural conductor of FIR and negative ions and is known to amplify the effects of other stones around it. It helps the body function more efficiently by restoring your energy and emits a low heat that is good for relaxation and meditation. Jade is often used as a treatment for kidney illnesses.

:: Tourmaline is said to be a magical stone that protects those who covet its powers. It is known to help detoxify tissue and body systems. It emits FIR and produces the highest amount of negative ions out of all the gemstones Healthyline use. Tourmaline helps to revitalise the mind and body, speed up your healing functions, and aid in the regeneration of bone tissue.

:: Obsidian doesn't produce FIR or negative ions but is a healing stone. The jet black colour of the stone is believed to draw all negativity to it, both physically and mentally, protecting the user from any harm. Obsidian is a very powerful support gemstone, amplifying the effects of other stones around it.


Healthyline combine several different therapies in each of their products:

FIR (Far Infrared Rays)
FIR are invisible waves of energy that have the ability to penetrate all layers of the human body; deep in to tissues, muscles and bone. FIR are on the opposite side of the spectrum to harmful ultraviolet rays.

The sun, our bodies and our hands are always emitting FIR. In the past, this discovery lead to healing methods like palm healing. This has evolved in to what is now known as Reiki, a form of healing that utilises the heat from the palms of the hands to assist in the body's natural healing process. Science has been able to focus the healing component of FIR and utilise these rays to improve our natural healing abilities.

FIR
:: control muscle and joint pain
:: detoxify your body
:: reduce pain and stiffness
:: relieve back pain symptoms
:: help chronic fatigue
:: improve quality of life and overall well-being
:: reduce blood pressure levels
:: treat some forms of cancer
:: lower side effects of diabetes
:: improve motor functions
:: prevent sunburn
:: treat arteriovenous fistula
:: treat allergic rhinitis
 
Further reading:

PEMF (Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy)
PEMF, also known as Low Field Magnetic Stimulation (LFMS), uses electromagnetic fields in an attempt to enhance your body's overall functioning as well as improving blood circulation, reducing chronic pain, promoting bone healing, alleviating symptoms of arthritis, treating symptoms of depression, increasing range of motion, and more.

The process of receiving PEMF involves sending energy waves towards damaged and injured areas of the body. The waves pass through the injured areas and increase the spin of the electrons within them. As a result, the cell's potential is restored and improved healing can take place.

PEMF
:: relieves pain
:: improves blood circulation
:: helps with arthritis
:: relieves the symptoms of depression
:: treats migraines
:: promotes bone healing
:: decreases diabetic factors
:: induces nerve repair
:: increases range of motion

Further reading:

Negative Ions
Ions are invisible charged particles in the air - either molecules or atoms, which bear an electric charge. Some particles are positively charged and some are negatively charged. Positive ions are molecules that have lost one or more electrons, whereas negative ions are actually oxygen atoms with extra negatively charged electrons.

Negative ions are abundant in nature, especially around waterfalls, by the sea, after a storm, in mountains and forests. The highest concentration of positive ions can be found in polluted cities, crowded areas and in confined spaces such as offices, industrial areas, schools and cars.

Negative ions are beneficial for the human body and are scientifically tied to a lot of health benefits, whereas positive ions are harmful.

Further reading:

Photon Light Therapy
Different body tissues absorb energy from different wavelengths of light energy. Unlike FIR, photon light therapy has a shorter wavelength so it doesn't penetrate as deeply. Photon therapy uses visible red lights at a wavelength of 660 nanometers.

Photon light requires direct exposure to the skin in order for it's full effects to be received. When the photon light is absorbed by the body, it forms in to nitric oxide. This stimulates synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) which is essential for the metabolism of all cellular regeneration.

Photon light therapy assists directly with the mitochondria, the part of the cell responsible for generating proteins and collagen. The new cells are able to destroy old cells, assisting even further with detoxification.

Photon light therapy 
:: treats depression
:: improves motor function and nerve regeneration
:: promotes better wound healing
:: improves skin and acne


Hot stone therapy
Tourmaline, jade and amethyst are natural conductors of FIR and negative ions when they are activated by the heating technology. While you get all the typical healing experiences associated with hot stone therapy, these benefits are greatly amplified by the combination of these gemstones.

Magnetic Therapy


Magnetic therapy is a science focused on maintaining the body's proper electromagnetic field to promote healing.

When a magnet is placed on the body, it promotes increased blood circulation. This increased blood flow helps to deliver more nutrients to your body and flush out toxins and contaminants. The magnet also relaxes the surrounding muscles and tissues, enabling your body to heal more efficiently.

Magnets offer a natural form of pain relief that can be used as frequently as required with no side effects.

Magnetic therapy
:: is a natural pain reliever
:: reduces swelling
:: promotes healing after injury or surgery
:: reduces the symptoms of osteoarthritis
:: helps general well-being


Healthyline's products can help with the following health issues:

:: Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis
FIR stimulates the circulatory system, promoting increased oxygenation throughout the body. FIR can also help create white blood cells which improve your immune system and overall wellness. You may also find a decrease in stiffness and stress.

Negative ions focus on the respiratory system and detoxification. They can help improve mood levels and generate more serotonin in the brain to facilitate sleep. Negative ions can help restore energy levels and help the body function more efficiently.

PEMF initiates cellular revitalisation and helps maintain proper healing functions throughout the body. PEMF can alleviate painful symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and increase the range of motion, reduce muscle spasms and neck pain in osteoarthritis patients.

:: Chronic fatigue syndrome
FIR can improve your sleep, reduce sleep disturbances and minimise aches and pains associated with chronic fatigue syndrome. FIR can also help create white blood cells which improve your immune system and overall wellness.

Negative ions focus on the respiratory system and detoxification. They can help improve mood levels, generate more serotonin in the brain to facilitate sleep and restore energy levels.

:: Sleep conditions
Magnetic therapy improves blood circulation. This helps to deliver more nutrients to your body and flush out toxins and contaminants. Magnetic therapy also relaxes muscles and tissue. The process stimulates melatonin in your brain, the hormone responsible for regulating sleep.

FIR and negative ions increase blood flow, promoting oxygenation that improves blood pressure and the immune system.

Negative ions will also improve your state of mind as a result of detoxification and increased serotonin levels.

:: Fibromyalgia
FIR and negative ions influence aspects of the body that are altered by fibromyalgia.

PEMF can help those with fibromyalgia recover some of their body's natural ability to manage it's pain and relieve muscle tension.

Photon light therapy aids fibromyalgia sufferers as it can relieve neuropathic pain and strengthen the immune system to help the body improve it's wellness. Fibromyalgia sufferers might notice a decrease in fibro-fog, a reduction in tense muscles, increased ability to get to sleep and a reduction in overall pain and swelling.

:: ... And many more.


If you are interested in any of Healthyline's products, then you can view their full range in their online store.

Healthyline have also, very kindly, offered a 10% discount to you all. Just visit their online store and enter the code above at checkout!

If you would like any further information, you can find Healthyline on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Youtube.

S.
18:00:00
Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2IUvvak

:: This column was originally posted on Endometriosis News ::


If there is one day of the year I find difficult, it’s April 1st, aka April Fools Day. And I don’t think I’m alone in feeling this way. Let me explain… 

We were blessed with a gorgeous little boy. He’s a funny, loud, energetic, loving 3-year-old now. But, one thing that doesn’t escape me, is the years of trying for him: the heartbreak every single month of finding I had once again started my period when I wished upon every star that I wouldn’t; the knowledge that my body had failed us both. 2 long years passed before we got our chance at in vitro fertilization (IVF) and fell pregnant on the first round. Our only round, since none of our other 9 eggs survived.

We have been lucky in our journey. Others, less so. The trying can continue for years to no avail. No amount of money, fertility treatments, magic potions or pills work. These women live with that hope in their hearts that one day they will hold a baby in their arms, and, for some, it doesn’t come.

There are many paths on the road of infertility, pregnancy and baby loss. It’s not always quite as clear-cut as you get your baby and everything is forgotten. And this is the reason that, still now, I get a sense of dread wash over me towards the end of March every single year.

You see, and it might seem a little unbelievable if you haven’t ever witnessed it yourself, but there are people out there who think it’s hilarious to make a joke of pregnancy on April Fools Day. Maybe I’m just being a sensitive Sally, but I can’t see myself having found this funny even if I hadn’t have been through the whole infertility thing.

I’m hoping that you haven’t seen these types of “jokes” before, but they go something like “Surprise! We’re pregnant!”... Followed quickly by a “April Fools! Got’cha!” type message. Some do it to be funny, some to shock their family and friends. I have seen them, many a time. In fact, I’ve seen some of the top Instagrammers make jokes like this. One in particular has since been on her own adoption journey and might not have found her own jokes quite so funny now. Even one of my own idols, singer Gwen Stefani, made a joke of it back in 2016 by putting up a sonogram on her Instagram with the caption “It’s a girl”.

You see, pregnancy announcements are difficult enough as it is. Knowing someone else is getting their first, second, even fifth or more chance of becoming a parent when you cannot conceive is heartbreaking to say the least. But, once we get past our bitter emotions, we will at some point find that joy for the parents to be. We don’t want to be outcasts, we want to share in this wonderful news. It’s just sometimes not quite as instantaneous as we would all like.

But it’s not just the person making the joke that’s the problem in this situation. It’s the comments that follow. Someone will point out how hurtful something like this can be, only for others to tell them to “stop making it about themselves”. Can you ever imagine how painful it must be to have lost your baby or to have never experienced pregnancy and be told to “get over it”? Well, even if you can imagine, you will never know the sheer pain we feel deep inside. Nothing can ever make you “get over it”. These fake pregnancy announcements are just a massive reminder of what we do not have.

What I’m trying to say, is please don’t be that person. Just stop for a moment and think of the emotional impact your “joke” could have on those around you. Those who face infertility, pregnancy or baby loss don’t have big stickers on their foreheads or flashing signs pointing towards them. Much like chronic illness, these situations are invisible. Often, women, and their partners alike, might feel some sort of embarrassment in their plight. Not everyone likes to make it known to the world that their bodies cannot achieve what others can. And, while some of us do speak out about it, it doesn’t make it any easier.

If you take a look on April 1st, I assure you, there will be at least one person making a joke of pregnancy… Have you ever been hurt by a statement like this or do you think we should all lighten up and get a sense of humour?

You can follow my Endometriosis News column here.

S.

Please don’t make a joke of pregnancy this April Fools Day

Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2IUvvak

:: This column was originally posted on Endometriosis News ::


If there is one day of the year I find difficult, it’s April 1st, aka April Fools Day. And I don’t think I’m alone in feeling this way. Let me explain… 

We were blessed with a gorgeous little boy. He’s a funny, loud, energetic, loving 3-year-old now. But, one thing that doesn’t escape me, is the years of trying for him: the heartbreak every single month of finding I had once again started my period when I wished upon every star that I wouldn’t; the knowledge that my body had failed us both. 2 long years passed before we got our chance at in vitro fertilization (IVF) and fell pregnant on the first round. Our only round, since none of our other 9 eggs survived.

We have been lucky in our journey. Others, less so. The trying can continue for years to no avail. No amount of money, fertility treatments, magic potions or pills work. These women live with that hope in their hearts that one day they will hold a baby in their arms, and, for some, it doesn’t come.

There are many paths on the road of infertility, pregnancy and baby loss. It’s not always quite as clear-cut as you get your baby and everything is forgotten. And this is the reason that, still now, I get a sense of dread wash over me towards the end of March every single year.

You see, and it might seem a little unbelievable if you haven’t ever witnessed it yourself, but there are people out there who think it’s hilarious to make a joke of pregnancy on April Fools Day. Maybe I’m just being a sensitive Sally, but I can’t see myself having found this funny even if I hadn’t have been through the whole infertility thing.

I’m hoping that you haven’t seen these types of “jokes” before, but they go something like “Surprise! We’re pregnant!”... Followed quickly by a “April Fools! Got’cha!” type message. Some do it to be funny, some to shock their family and friends. I have seen them, many a time. In fact, I’ve seen some of the top Instagrammers make jokes like this. One in particular has since been on her own adoption journey and might not have found her own jokes quite so funny now. Even one of my own idols, singer Gwen Stefani, made a joke of it back in 2016 by putting up a sonogram on her Instagram with the caption “It’s a girl”.

You see, pregnancy announcements are difficult enough as it is. Knowing someone else is getting their first, second, even fifth or more chance of becoming a parent when you cannot conceive is heartbreaking to say the least. But, once we get past our bitter emotions, we will at some point find that joy for the parents to be. We don’t want to be outcasts, we want to share in this wonderful news. It’s just sometimes not quite as instantaneous as we would all like.

But it’s not just the person making the joke that’s the problem in this situation. It’s the comments that follow. Someone will point out how hurtful something like this can be, only for others to tell them to “stop making it about themselves”. Can you ever imagine how painful it must be to have lost your baby or to have never experienced pregnancy and be told to “get over it”? Well, even if you can imagine, you will never know the sheer pain we feel deep inside. Nothing can ever make you “get over it”. These fake pregnancy announcements are just a massive reminder of what we do not have.

What I’m trying to say, is please don’t be that person. Just stop for a moment and think of the emotional impact your “joke” could have on those around you. Those who face infertility, pregnancy or baby loss don’t have big stickers on their foreheads or flashing signs pointing towards them. Much like chronic illness, these situations are invisible. Often, women, and their partners alike, might feel some sort of embarrassment in their plight. Not everyone likes to make it known to the world that their bodies cannot achieve what others can. And, while some of us do speak out about it, it doesn’t make it any easier.

If you take a look on April 1st, I assure you, there will be at least one person making a joke of pregnancy… Have you ever been hurt by a statement like this or do you think we should all lighten up and get a sense of humour?

You can follow my Endometriosis News column here.

S.
15:26:00
Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2pyR5bP

:: This column was originally posted on Endometriosis News ::


Research into endometriosis is advancing and we regularly learn new things about the disease. However, a cure for endometriosis is yet to be identified and this is simply because we are yet to discover the actual cause of endometriosis.

There are many theories behind what causes endometriosis. These include oestrogen production, retrograde menstruation, genetic predisposition, lymphatic or circulatory spread, immune dysfunction, metaplasia and even, environmental causes. But none fully explain why the condition occurs. It is possible that a combination of these factors could cause endometriosis to develop.

There are also several myths floating around regarding the causes of the disease. These include abortion, wearing tampons, sexually transmitted diseases (STD’s), psychological trauma in early life, douching, diet, lack of exercise, contraceptives, the colour of your skin and/or sexual promiscuity. However, there is no evidence any of these factors cause endometriosis. One thing we do know is that there is no way of preventing the disease.

Let’s explore some of the treatment options that are commonly referred to as "cures" for endometriosis.

Pregnancy
During pregnancy, hormones help to regulate the many changes that take place in the body to enable a baby to be born safely. In early pregnancy, a females hormones (which includes oestrogen and progesterone) elevate to help the ovaries release an egg and implant it in to the lining of the uterus. Once an egg embeds in the uterine lining, hormones tell the blood-rich tissue to stay intact to support the growing baby - therefore, the body does not expel the lining as a period.

The symptoms of endometriosis are suppressed during pregnancy but the disease is not eradicated, and symptoms will usually return at some point post child-birth.

There are also cases where some women will only experience symptoms of endometriosis after having a child.

Hormone treatments
Hormone treatments last varying amounts of time. From birth control pills that can be taken for years, to shorter courses of injections like Zolodex or Lupron. 

These drugs act in a similar way to the hormones the body naturally creates during pregnancy, with the aim to stopping periods all together. The symptoms of endometriosis are therefore only suppressed, the disease is not eradicated and symptoms will usually return at some point after the treatment ends. 

Menopause
The menopause is a natural part of ageing that usually occurs in females between 45 and 55 years of age. As oestrogen levels decline, a woman stops having periods and is no longer able to get pregnant naturally.

With the body no longer having a regular menstrual cycle, it is thought that all symptoms of endometriosis should disappear. However, endometriosis can still occur past menopause.

Hysterectomy
A hysterectomy is a surgical procedure where the uterus is removed from a woman’s body. It is probably the most commonly reported ‘cure’ for endometriosis, but, it isn’t one. As endometriosis isn’t limited to the uterus, removing the uterus won’t eradicate endometriosis from other areas of the body. This means endometriosis will continue to grow.

It should be noted, however, that endometrial tissue can also grow in the muscle layers of the wall of the womb, causing a condition called adenomyosis. The only way to eliminate adenomyosis is via hysterectomy.

Surgery
There are a number of different techniques of laparoscopic surgery used in treating endometriosis. These include laser (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) ablation, electrocoagulation/diathermy, excision surgery, helica thermal coagulator and harmonic scalpel/CUSA (cavitron ultrasonic surgical aspirator).

Techniques such as laser ablation and electrical fulguration are ineffective because they don’t remove all of the endometriosis. With these surgeries, it is thought most patients symptoms return within a year. Excision surgery is seen as the gold standard of care in the treatment of endometriosis. This is because it removes the inflammatory tissue down to its roots, instead of just the tip of the disease. However, excision surgery is still not a cure for endometriosis and symptoms can return.


The phrase “cure” is often thrown around in both the medical world and by sufferers who have found a treatment that has worked for them, who have been led to believe by their doctors that this has subsequently rid them of the disease. However, if these treatments do not remove the disease from the body, and every single microscopic cell of it, the disease is simply suppressed - not eradicated.

Until a cure for endometriosis is discovered, these methods are seen as effective treatment paths in the management of endometriosis pain.

You can follow my Endometriosis News column here.

S.

Is there a cure for endometriosis?

Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2pyR5bP

:: This column was originally posted on Endometriosis News ::


Research into endometriosis is advancing and we regularly learn new things about the disease. However, a cure for endometriosis is yet to be identified and this is simply because we are yet to discover the actual cause of endometriosis.

There are many theories behind what causes endometriosis. These include oestrogen production, retrograde menstruation, genetic predisposition, lymphatic or circulatory spread, immune dysfunction, metaplasia and even, environmental causes. But none fully explain why the condition occurs. It is possible that a combination of these factors could cause endometriosis to develop.

There are also several myths floating around regarding the causes of the disease. These include abortion, wearing tampons, sexually transmitted diseases (STD’s), psychological trauma in early life, douching, diet, lack of exercise, contraceptives, the colour of your skin and/or sexual promiscuity. However, there is no evidence any of these factors cause endometriosis. One thing we do know is that there is no way of preventing the disease.

Let’s explore some of the treatment options that are commonly referred to as "cures" for endometriosis.

Pregnancy
During pregnancy, hormones help to regulate the many changes that take place in the body to enable a baby to be born safely. In early pregnancy, a females hormones (which includes oestrogen and progesterone) elevate to help the ovaries release an egg and implant it in to the lining of the uterus. Once an egg embeds in the uterine lining, hormones tell the blood-rich tissue to stay intact to support the growing baby - therefore, the body does not expel the lining as a period.

The symptoms of endometriosis are suppressed during pregnancy but the disease is not eradicated, and symptoms will usually return at some point post child-birth.

There are also cases where some women will only experience symptoms of endometriosis after having a child.

Hormone treatments
Hormone treatments last varying amounts of time. From birth control pills that can be taken for years, to shorter courses of injections like Zolodex or Lupron. 

These drugs act in a similar way to the hormones the body naturally creates during pregnancy, with the aim to stopping periods all together. The symptoms of endometriosis are therefore only suppressed, the disease is not eradicated and symptoms will usually return at some point after the treatment ends. 

Menopause
The menopause is a natural part of ageing that usually occurs in females between 45 and 55 years of age. As oestrogen levels decline, a woman stops having periods and is no longer able to get pregnant naturally.

With the body no longer having a regular menstrual cycle, it is thought that all symptoms of endometriosis should disappear. However, endometriosis can still occur past menopause.

Hysterectomy
A hysterectomy is a surgical procedure where the uterus is removed from a woman’s body. It is probably the most commonly reported ‘cure’ for endometriosis, but, it isn’t one. As endometriosis isn’t limited to the uterus, removing the uterus won’t eradicate endometriosis from other areas of the body. This means endometriosis will continue to grow.

It should be noted, however, that endometrial tissue can also grow in the muscle layers of the wall of the womb, causing a condition called adenomyosis. The only way to eliminate adenomyosis is via hysterectomy.

Surgery
There are a number of different techniques of laparoscopic surgery used in treating endometriosis. These include laser (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) ablation, electrocoagulation/diathermy, excision surgery, helica thermal coagulator and harmonic scalpel/CUSA (cavitron ultrasonic surgical aspirator).

Techniques such as laser ablation and electrical fulguration are ineffective because they don’t remove all of the endometriosis. With these surgeries, it is thought most patients symptoms return within a year. Excision surgery is seen as the gold standard of care in the treatment of endometriosis. This is because it removes the inflammatory tissue down to its roots, instead of just the tip of the disease. However, excision surgery is still not a cure for endometriosis and symptoms can return.


The phrase “cure” is often thrown around in both the medical world and by sufferers who have found a treatment that has worked for them, who have been led to believe by their doctors that this has subsequently rid them of the disease. However, if these treatments do not remove the disease from the body, and every single microscopic cell of it, the disease is simply suppressed - not eradicated.

Until a cure for endometriosis is discovered, these methods are seen as effective treatment paths in the management of endometriosis pain.

You can follow my Endometriosis News column here.

S.
18:17:00
Image courtesy of http://bit.ly/2FVlStw

:: This column was originally posted on Endometriosis News ::


1. Endometriosis is when endometrium is found growing outside of the uterus
False! Many resources will tell you that endometriosis is when endometrium (the mucous membrane that lines the inside of the uterus) is found growing outside of this area. This is incorrect. Endometriosis occurs when tissue similar to the lining of the uterus is found growing outside of the womb, usually in the pelvis, although it can be found anywhere in the body.

2. Isn’t endometriosis just a bad period?
False! Menstruation is defined as “when blood and tissue come out of your vagina” and is a natural process that all women will experience as their bodies physically mature. Any discomfort should go after the 3-8 day period. Endometriosis is a painful, chronic, gynaecological disease that affects 1 in 10 women. The pain of endometriosis can correlate with the menstrual cycle and this is where confusion can be caused. But, it may also be experienced at other times during your cycle including during or after sex, internal examinations, ovulation and bladder/bowel movements.

3. Painful periods are normal!
False! We cannot get away from the old beliefs that period pain is “normal”, or that it’s “in our heads” or to “get on with it”, because it’s a part of “being a woman”. Period pain should never interfere with your daily life. If it does, then it isn’t normal.

4. Endometriosis can be cured!
False! There is no cure for endometriosis. Pregnancy and hormonal treatments will suppress the symptoms of endometriosis but they will not eradicate the disease and symptoms will usually return. Some women may only experience symptoms of endometriosis post childbirth. Endometriosis can even still occur past menopause. Surgery can be performed to remove endometriosis but endometriosis can still return.

Hysterectomy is most commonly reported as a cure for endometriosis, but, it isn’t. However, endometrial tissue can also grow in the muscle layers of the wall of the womb (adenomyosis), and the only way to eradicate this is via hysterectomy.

5. I tried this treatment and it worked for me so it will definitely work for you!
False! It is always worth trying every single treatment option that is suggested to you; whether that be surgery, hormonal treatments, pain relief, dietary changes, exercise, etc. But because endometriosis occurs so differently in each and every one of us, is situated in different areas, causes different symptoms, and because our bodies are all so different too, the same treatments will always have different results.

6. You’re too young to have endometriosis!
False! Teenagers and women in their 20’s are not too young to have endometriosis! Endometriosis symptoms may start to arise during the teenage years but is often set aside by medical professionals as girls not knowing their bodies yet. This then leads to a later diagnosis in their 20’s or 30’s.

7. I have stage IV (severe) endometriosis so the pain is far worse than your stage I (mild) endometriosis!
False! Endometriosis is often classified as mild, moderate or severe, or as stage I-IV.These stages provide a useful guideline, however, they also have limitations, as the amount of endometriosis does not always correspond to the amount of pain and discomfort. A small amount of endometriosis can be more painful than severe endometriosis. It depends, largely, on where the endometriosis is actually growing inside the body.

8. I have endometriosis so I will never be able to have children
False! Endometriosis does not automatically mean you are infertile, although infertility can be a symptom of endometriosis. It is estimated that 30-40% of women with endometriosis are subfertile. Infertility is not always caused by endometriosis - it can be due to many other factors.

9. You have caused endometriosis by your lifestyle choices!
False! The actual cause of endometriosis is unknown. There are many theories including oestrogen production, retrograde menstruation, genetic predisposition, lymphatic or circulatory spread, immune dysfunction, metaplasia and even, environmental causes, but none fully explain why the condition occurs. It is possible that a combination of these factors could cause endometriosis to develop.

Abortion, wearing tampons, sexually transmitted diseases (STD’s), psychological trauma in early life, douching, diet, lack of exercise, contraceptives, the colour of your skin and/or sexual promiscuity, do not cause endometriosis and there is no way of preventing the disease.

10. Endometriosis means I have cancer, right!?
False! Endometriosis is not an infection, it isn’t contagious, and it isn’t a cancer. However, every single benign tissue in our bodies has the potential to turn into cancer; therefore some argue that deposits of endometriosis could turn into cancer. This would be extremely rare though.

You can follow my Endometriosis News column here.

S.

The top 10 endometriosis myths debunked!

Image courtesy of http://bit.ly/2FVlStw

:: This column was originally posted on Endometriosis News ::


1. Endometriosis is when endometrium is found growing outside of the uterus
False! Many resources will tell you that endometriosis is when endometrium (the mucous membrane that lines the inside of the uterus) is found growing outside of this area. This is incorrect. Endometriosis occurs when tissue similar to the lining of the uterus is found growing outside of the womb, usually in the pelvis, although it can be found anywhere in the body.

2. Isn’t endometriosis just a bad period?
False! Menstruation is defined as “when blood and tissue come out of your vagina” and is a natural process that all women will experience as their bodies physically mature. Any discomfort should go after the 3-8 day period. Endometriosis is a painful, chronic, gynaecological disease that affects 1 in 10 women. The pain of endometriosis can correlate with the menstrual cycle and this is where confusion can be caused. But, it may also be experienced at other times during your cycle including during or after sex, internal examinations, ovulation and bladder/bowel movements.

3. Painful periods are normal!
False! We cannot get away from the old beliefs that period pain is “normal”, or that it’s “in our heads” or to “get on with it”, because it’s a part of “being a woman”. Period pain should never interfere with your daily life. If it does, then it isn’t normal.

4. Endometriosis can be cured!
False! There is no cure for endometriosis. Pregnancy and hormonal treatments will suppress the symptoms of endometriosis but they will not eradicate the disease and symptoms will usually return. Some women may only experience symptoms of endometriosis post childbirth. Endometriosis can even still occur past menopause. Surgery can be performed to remove endometriosis but endometriosis can still return.

Hysterectomy is most commonly reported as a cure for endometriosis, but, it isn’t. However, endometrial tissue can also grow in the muscle layers of the wall of the womb (adenomyosis), and the only way to eradicate this is via hysterectomy.

5. I tried this treatment and it worked for me so it will definitely work for you!
False! It is always worth trying every single treatment option that is suggested to you; whether that be surgery, hormonal treatments, pain relief, dietary changes, exercise, etc. But because endometriosis occurs so differently in each and every one of us, is situated in different areas, causes different symptoms, and because our bodies are all so different too, the same treatments will always have different results.

6. You’re too young to have endometriosis!
False! Teenagers and women in their 20’s are not too young to have endometriosis! Endometriosis symptoms may start to arise during the teenage years but is often set aside by medical professionals as girls not knowing their bodies yet. This then leads to a later diagnosis in their 20’s or 30’s.

7. I have stage IV (severe) endometriosis so the pain is far worse than your stage I (mild) endometriosis!
False! Endometriosis is often classified as mild, moderate or severe, or as stage I-IV.These stages provide a useful guideline, however, they also have limitations, as the amount of endometriosis does not always correspond to the amount of pain and discomfort. A small amount of endometriosis can be more painful than severe endometriosis. It depends, largely, on where the endometriosis is actually growing inside the body.

8. I have endometriosis so I will never be able to have children
False! Endometriosis does not automatically mean you are infertile, although infertility can be a symptom of endometriosis. It is estimated that 30-40% of women with endometriosis are subfertile. Infertility is not always caused by endometriosis - it can be due to many other factors.

9. You have caused endometriosis by your lifestyle choices!
False! The actual cause of endometriosis is unknown. There are many theories including oestrogen production, retrograde menstruation, genetic predisposition, lymphatic or circulatory spread, immune dysfunction, metaplasia and even, environmental causes, but none fully explain why the condition occurs. It is possible that a combination of these factors could cause endometriosis to develop.

Abortion, wearing tampons, sexually transmitted diseases (STD’s), psychological trauma in early life, douching, diet, lack of exercise, contraceptives, the colour of your skin and/or sexual promiscuity, do not cause endometriosis and there is no way of preventing the disease.

10. Endometriosis means I have cancer, right!?
False! Endometriosis is not an infection, it isn’t contagious, and it isn’t a cancer. However, every single benign tissue in our bodies has the potential to turn into cancer; therefore some argue that deposits of endometriosis could turn into cancer. This would be extremely rare though.

You can follow my Endometriosis News column here.

S.
17:00:00
Image courtesy of http://bit.ly/2oN8eP6

:: This column was originally posted on Endometriosis News ::


March 1st sees the start of endometriosis awareness month. A whole month where patients, charities and organisations alike, share information on the disease in order to raise much needed awareness.

But, why does endometriosis need awareness? Doesn’t every illness have plenty of awareness surrounding it already? Well, no. Awareness is desperately needed for endometriosis. So few people have heard of the disease, even though an estimated 176 million women worldwide, and 1 in 10 of us suffer with endometriosis. There is also a huge misconception surrounding endometriosis. Isn’t it just a “bad period"? Can’t you just take paracetamol for the pain? Doesn’t pregnancy or hysterectomy cure endometriosis? There are so many false facts circulating about endometriosis that even those suffering with the disease can get confused about it!

What can we all do to raise awareness and get the correct facts circulating?

1. Get talking
The simplest way to raise awareness is to talk to others about endometriosis, whether that be family, friends or co-workers. Drop it in to conversation wherever you can. You’ll be surprised to find out how many people actually want to know more!

2. Take to social media
Get online and share facts about endometriosis or your own experiences and feelings towards the disease. People might not be interested, but the important thing is that they will have seen the word “endometriosis”. This may prompt them to search for information or they might know someone who also suffers with it. My hope is that by seeing the word endometriosis, they will retain it somehow and know that it exists.

You don’t need to overshare, post every day or write a blog (although I would always encourage other women with endometriosis to do this because, as well as raising awareness, it is a great source of therapy!). Sharing something every now and then is all that’s needed and you will have done your bit then!

3. Join an event
There are lots of different events that take place all year round, but particularly throughout endometriosis awareness month. In the UK, endometriosis awareness week runs from Saturday 3rd-Sunday 11th March. There is a worldwide endometriosis march on Saturday 24th March that sees individual groups of people walking and sharing information along the way. Much like a peaceful protest and I would imagine pretty good fun! These marches are taking place in major cities across the world so have a look to see if there is one near to you. There are even virtual endometriosis marches for those who do not have one near to them or for those too ill to attend. Please check with your countries individual endometriosis charities to see if there are any events being run near you.

4. Sign and share petitions
There are hundreds of petitions in circulation across the world hoping to get endometriosis in to education or to raise awareness in the medical field to gain quicker diagnosis’ for women. Please check with your countries government websites or petition websites like Change or 38 Degrees, amongst many others. 

5. Educate
Firstly, and as I would suggest to anyone newly diagnosed, get educated! Read books, online articles and websites. Improve your own knowledge of endometriosis. In doing this, we can share correct information and help others to understand not only endometriosis, but also that painful periods are not normal. This may prompt those sharing similar experiences to seek medical advice.

6. Share your story
You can share your endometriosis story by writing a blog, contacting media outlets or through others blogs or social media accounts (Instagram is particularly good for this). This doesn't only help to raise awareness, but can prompt women (both diagnosed and not-diagnosed) to seek medical advice if they relate to your experiences. I feel sharing different women's stories and experiences is one of the key areas in raising awareness because endometriosis is different for everyone and can affect women's lives in a multitude of ways. 

There are so many ways of raising awareness - what will you be doing this month? Will it be different to any other month or do you believe awareness needs to be raised all year long?

You can follow my Endometriosis News column here.

S.

6 ways of raising awareness during endometriosis awareness month

Image courtesy of http://bit.ly/2oN8eP6

:: This column was originally posted on Endometriosis News ::


March 1st sees the start of endometriosis awareness month. A whole month where patients, charities and organisations alike, share information on the disease in order to raise much needed awareness.

But, why does endometriosis need awareness? Doesn’t every illness have plenty of awareness surrounding it already? Well, no. Awareness is desperately needed for endometriosis. So few people have heard of the disease, even though an estimated 176 million women worldwide, and 1 in 10 of us suffer with endometriosis. There is also a huge misconception surrounding endometriosis. Isn’t it just a “bad period"? Can’t you just take paracetamol for the pain? Doesn’t pregnancy or hysterectomy cure endometriosis? There are so many false facts circulating about endometriosis that even those suffering with the disease can get confused about it!

What can we all do to raise awareness and get the correct facts circulating?

1. Get talking
The simplest way to raise awareness is to talk to others about endometriosis, whether that be family, friends or co-workers. Drop it in to conversation wherever you can. You’ll be surprised to find out how many people actually want to know more!

2. Take to social media
Get online and share facts about endometriosis or your own experiences and feelings towards the disease. People might not be interested, but the important thing is that they will have seen the word “endometriosis”. This may prompt them to search for information or they might know someone who also suffers with it. My hope is that by seeing the word endometriosis, they will retain it somehow and know that it exists.

You don’t need to overshare, post every day or write a blog (although I would always encourage other women with endometriosis to do this because, as well as raising awareness, it is a great source of therapy!). Sharing something every now and then is all that’s needed and you will have done your bit then!

3. Join an event
There are lots of different events that take place all year round, but particularly throughout endometriosis awareness month. In the UK, endometriosis awareness week runs from Saturday 3rd-Sunday 11th March. There is a worldwide endometriosis march on Saturday 24th March that sees individual groups of people walking and sharing information along the way. Much like a peaceful protest and I would imagine pretty good fun! These marches are taking place in major cities across the world so have a look to see if there is one near to you. There are even virtual endometriosis marches for those who do not have one near to them or for those too ill to attend. Please check with your countries individual endometriosis charities to see if there are any events being run near you.

4. Sign and share petitions
There are hundreds of petitions in circulation across the world hoping to get endometriosis in to education or to raise awareness in the medical field to gain quicker diagnosis’ for women. Please check with your countries government websites or petition websites like Change or 38 Degrees, amongst many others. 

5. Educate
Firstly, and as I would suggest to anyone newly diagnosed, get educated! Read books, online articles and websites. Improve your own knowledge of endometriosis. In doing this, we can share correct information and help others to understand not only endometriosis, but also that painful periods are not normal. This may prompt those sharing similar experiences to seek medical advice.

6. Share your story
You can share your endometriosis story by writing a blog, contacting media outlets or through others blogs or social media accounts (Instagram is particularly good for this). This doesn't only help to raise awareness, but can prompt women (both diagnosed and not-diagnosed) to seek medical advice if they relate to your experiences. I feel sharing different women's stories and experiences is one of the key areas in raising awareness because endometriosis is different for everyone and can affect women's lives in a multitude of ways. 

There are so many ways of raising awareness - what will you be doing this month? Will it be different to any other month or do you believe awareness needs to be raised all year long?

You can follow my Endometriosis News column here.

S.
16:00:00
Diana Falzone is an American journalist.

Diana was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2016, after a specialist found a mass in her uterus. In a 2017 article, she states that she underwent a 3.5 hour surgery to remove endometriosis from her uterus, ovaries and bladder that was causing "excessive bleeding and paralysing pain".

"It was just days after my 33rd birthday when my doctor delivered the worst news of my life: I will likely never have a child and fulfill my greatest wish of being a mother.... When hit with the news that I am infertile, I could not stop crying. And not only was it very unlikely I’d ever conceive, my health was in jeopardy."

After tests found she had a low egg reserve, she completed three rounds of egg retrieval to save any remaining eggs.

Diana gave birth to her son in 2018.


Image courtesy of https://r29.co/2UEiTuA

Celebrities with endometriosis: Diana Falzone

Diana Falzone is an American journalist.

Diana was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2016, after a specialist found a mass in her uterus. In a 2017 article, she states that she underwent a 3.5 hour surgery to remove endometriosis from her uterus, ovaries and bladder that was causing "excessive bleeding and paralysing pain".

"It was just days after my 33rd birthday when my doctor delivered the worst news of my life: I will likely never have a child and fulfill my greatest wish of being a mother.... When hit with the news that I am infertile, I could not stop crying. And not only was it very unlikely I’d ever conceive, my health was in jeopardy."

After tests found she had a low egg reserve, she completed three rounds of egg retrieval to save any remaining eggs.

Diana gave birth to her son in 2018.


Image courtesy of https://r29.co/2UEiTuA
23:35:00

Katrina Kaif is an English actress.

Katrina was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2009 and underwent laparoscopic surgery for the disease.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2yf17Xv

Celebrities with endometriosis: Katrina Kaif


Katrina Kaif is an English actress.

Katrina was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2009 and underwent laparoscopic surgery for the disease.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2yf17Xv
23:10:00

Sarah Maree Cameron is an Australian radio presenter and ambassador for Endometriosis Australia.

Sarah was diagnosed with endometriosis is 2010.

She said "Chocolate, ice cream and pain killers might help some women during that time of the month, but, due to my endometriosis, I feel like my whole world stops".


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/38b69nw

Celebrities with endometriosis: Sarah Maree Cameron


Sarah Maree Cameron is an Australian radio presenter and ambassador for Endometriosis Australia.

Sarah was diagnosed with endometriosis is 2010.

She said "Chocolate, ice cream and pain killers might help some women during that time of the month, but, due to my endometriosis, I feel like my whole world stops".


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/38b69nw
23:08:00

Elisabeth Oas is an American actress.

Elisabeth was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2009, after encountering pain during her second pregnancy. She also suffers with interstitial cystitis and pelvic floor dysfunction.

Elisabeth founded and co-hosts a radio show/podcast called 'The Pelvic Messenger' which discusses issues surrounding chronic pelvic pain, diseases, syndromes and treatments.


Image courtesy of https://imdb.to/2Jmi84j

Celebrities with endometriosis: Elisabeth Oas


Elisabeth Oas is an American actress.

Elisabeth was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2009, after encountering pain during her second pregnancy. She also suffers with interstitial cystitis and pelvic floor dysfunction.

Elisabeth founded and co-hosts a radio show/podcast called 'The Pelvic Messenger' which discusses issues surrounding chronic pelvic pain, diseases, syndromes and treatments.


Image courtesy of https://imdb.to/2Jmi84j
21:24:00

Julia Bradbury is an English television presenter.

Julia was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2006 during a routine check up and, following on from this, had laparoscopic surgery for the disease.

Her son, Zephyr, was born in 2011 and in 2015 she gave birth to twin girls, Xanthe and Zena, who were conceived via IVF treatment.


Image courtesy of http://dailym.ai/2QSOSXc

Celebrities with endometriosis: Julia Bradbury


Julia Bradbury is an English television presenter.

Julia was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2006 during a routine check up and, following on from this, had laparoscopic surgery for the disease.

Her son, Zephyr, was born in 2011 and in 2015 she gave birth to twin girls, Xanthe and Zena, who were conceived via IVF treatment.


Image courtesy of http://dailym.ai/2QSOSXc
21:07:00

Lorne Spicer is an English television presenter.

Lorne was diagnosed with endometriosis when she had problems trying to conceive. After a series of operations and treatments, Lorne was told by doctors that she was clear of the disease.

She has one son.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2WSwilA

Celebrities with endometriosis: Lorne Spicer


Lorne Spicer is an English television presenter.

Lorne was diagnosed with endometriosis when she had problems trying to conceive. After a series of operations and treatments, Lorne was told by doctors that she was clear of the disease.

She has one son.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2WSwilA

20:39:00

Andrea McLean is a Scottish journalist and television presenter.

Andrea was diagnosed with endometriosis when she was 28 years old, and had a blocked fallopian tube and cysts on her ovaries.

She was put on to Clomid, but, after two years of trying to conceive, fell pregnant before starting the main IVF treatment. Her son, Finlay, was born in 2001.

She gave birth to her daughter, Amy, in 2006, after conceiving naturally.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2JiZ6vC

Celebrities with endometriosis: Andrea McLean


Andrea McLean is a Scottish journalist and television presenter.

Andrea was diagnosed with endometriosis when she was 28 years old, and had a blocked fallopian tube and cysts on her ovaries.

She was put on to Clomid, but, after two years of trying to conceive, fell pregnant before starting the main IVF treatment. Her son, Finlay, was born in 2001.

She gave birth to her daughter, Amy, in 2006, after conceiving naturally.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2JiZ6vC
20:08:00

Tia Mowry-Hardrict is an American actress.

Tia was diagnosed with endometriosis when she was 27, after suffering from severe cramps since she was 21.

Tia had surgery but, unfortunately, 2 years later, the pain returned. She had a second surgery and then started The Body Ecology Diet. After one year of being on the diet, she fell pregnant.

Her son, Cree, was born in 2011. She also has a daughter, born in 2018.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/3bBC3sd

Celebrities with endometriosis: Tia Mowry-Hardrict


Tia Mowry-Hardrict is an American actress.

Tia was diagnosed with endometriosis when she was 27, after suffering from severe cramps since she was 21.

Tia had surgery but, unfortunately, 2 years later, the pain returned. She had a second surgery and then started The Body Ecology Diet. After one year of being on the diet, she fell pregnant.

Her son, Cree, was born in 2011. She also has a daughter, born in 2018.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/3bBC3sd
18:53:00

Marilyn Monroe was an American actress, model and singer. She died in 1962 at the age of 36.

She never had children, though fell pregnant numerous times. All of her pregnancies ended in miscarriage and, reportedly, at least one ectopic pregnancy due to severe endometriosis.

There is a rumour that she went in to one surgery with a note taped to her stomach, pleading with the doctors to not remove her reproductive organs.

Although there is much mystery surrounding her death, many think it is indirectly linked to her endometriosis. The disease caused her to become addicted to painkillers which in turn aggravated her psychological problems.

Her x-rays from one of her surgeries for the disease fetched $54,000 at auction in 1954.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/39q1P0V

Celebrities with endometriosis: Marilyn Monroe


Marilyn Monroe was an American actress, model and singer. She died in 1962 at the age of 36.

She never had children, though fell pregnant numerous times. All of her pregnancies ended in miscarriage and, reportedly, at least one ectopic pregnancy due to severe endometriosis.

There is a rumour that she went in to one surgery with a note taped to her stomach, pleading with the doctors to not remove her reproductive organs.

Although there is much mystery surrounding her death, many think it is indirectly linked to her endometriosis. The disease caused her to become addicted to painkillers which in turn aggravated her psychological problems.

Her x-rays from one of her surgeries for the disease fetched $54,000 at auction in 1954.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/39q1P0V
18:02:00

Louise Redknapp is an English singer, songwriter and media personality.

After trying for more than two years for a baby, Louise was told by her doctor that she would have to go through a lot to have children, and still might not be successful. She says, "Finding out you can't have children takes a bit of your femininity away. It's an odd feeling, like you've completely under-achieved, which is not what I'm good at dealing with."

Louise had laser surgery for the endometriosis and was about to embark on IVF treatment when she discovered she was pregnant with her first son, Charley, born in 2004. She gave birth to her second son, Beau, in 2008.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2xxVjI0

Celebrities with endometriosis: Louise Redknapp


Louise Redknapp is an English singer, songwriter and media personality.

After trying for more than two years for a baby, Louise was told by her doctor that she would have to go through a lot to have children, and still might not be successful. She says, "Finding out you can't have children takes a bit of your femininity away. It's an odd feeling, like you've completely under-achieved, which is not what I'm good at dealing with."

Louise had laser surgery for the endometriosis and was about to embark on IVF treatment when she discovered she was pregnant with her first son, Charley, born in 2004. She gave birth to her second son, Beau, in 2008.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2xxVjI0
17:30:00

Susan Sarandon is an American actress and activist.

Susan was diagnosed with endometriosis in 1983 after suffering from pain, irregular bleeding and fainting. She was told that if she ever wanted children she would have to have surgery, and was put on to birth control pills and painkillers.

She has three children; Eva, born in 1985, Jack, born in 1989, and Miles, born in 1992.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2UnP6Yd

Celebrities with endometriosis: Susan Sarandon


Susan Sarandon is an American actress and activist.

Susan was diagnosed with endometriosis in 1983 after suffering from pain, irregular bleeding and fainting. She was told that if she ever wanted children she would have to have surgery, and was put on to birth control pills and painkillers.

She has three children; Eva, born in 1985, Jack, born in 1989, and Miles, born in 1992.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2UnP6Yd
16:06:00

Julianne Hough is an American dancer, actress, singer and songwriter.

Julianne believes she started suffering with the symptoms of endometriosis when she was around 15 years old, but was told it was normal. Her mother and sister also have endometriosis.

In 2008, Julianne had an ultrasound which revealed she had a cyst on her left ovary and scar tissue outside of her uterus, which had spread to her appendix and right hip. She had laparoscopic surgery a week later. It was found the endometriosis had also spread to her fallopian tubes and bladder.

Julianne decided to speak publicly about her endometriosis to help de-stigmatise the conditions surrounding the disease.


Image courtesy of http://bit.ly/2TB8q46

Celebrities with endometriosis: Julianne Hough


Julianne Hough is an American dancer, actress, singer and songwriter.

Julianne believes she started suffering with the symptoms of endometriosis when she was around 15 years old, but was told it was normal. Her mother and sister also have endometriosis.

In 2008, Julianne had an ultrasound which revealed she had a cyst on her left ovary and scar tissue outside of her uterus, which had spread to her appendix and right hip. She had laparoscopic surgery a week later. It was found the endometriosis had also spread to her fallopian tubes and bladder.

Julianne decided to speak publicly about her endometriosis to help de-stigmatise the conditions surrounding the disease.


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16:06:00

Kirsten Storms is an American actress and voice actress.

Kirsten was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2011.

She has one daughter, Harper Rose, born in 2014.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Kirsten Storms


Kirsten Storms is an American actress and voice actress.

Kirsten was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2011.

She has one daughter, Harper Rose, born in 2014.


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16:05:00

Jillian Michaels is an American personal trainer, businesswoman, author and television personality.

Jillian says she learned very early on that she had endometriosis and polycystic ovaries.

She struggled with infertility due to endometriosis having blocked her fallopian tubes, but has two children, Lukensia and Pheonix, one of whom she adopted and another that her partner gave birth to.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Jillian Michaels


Jillian Michaels is an American personal trainer, businesswoman, author and television personality.

Jillian says she learned very early on that she had endometriosis and polycystic ovaries.

She struggled with infertility due to endometriosis having blocked her fallopian tubes, but has two children, Lukensia and Pheonix, one of whom she adopted and another that her partner gave birth to.


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16:05:00

Anna McPartlin is an Irish novelist.

Anna first suffered problems with her endometriosis in her early 20's. "I began to suffer with kidney and bladder problems and spent a lot of time in and out of hospital undergoing treatment and investigations. From the initial symptoms, it took at least eight years for me to be diagnosed with endometriosis and this only happened due to the influence of my aunt who was a gynaecological nurse and believed my problems sounded like endometriosis. She pushed me to move from a kidney specialist to a gynaecologist."

A diagnostic laparoscopy revealed Anna had endometriosis on her bladder, uterus, abdominal wall and fallopian tubes. The surgeon removed the scar tissue and she experienced a year of no pain or bladder issues. Unfortunately, when Anna and her husband started trying for children, they found they were unable to conceive and since then, they have tried IVF and other treatments including aromatherapy, acupuncture and dietary changes.

"Although my symptoms are ongoing, I am so much better than I was before diagnosis", she says.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Anna McPartlin


Anna McPartlin is an Irish novelist.

Anna first suffered problems with her endometriosis in her early 20's. "I began to suffer with kidney and bladder problems and spent a lot of time in and out of hospital undergoing treatment and investigations. From the initial symptoms, it took at least eight years for me to be diagnosed with endometriosis and this only happened due to the influence of my aunt who was a gynaecological nurse and believed my problems sounded like endometriosis. She pushed me to move from a kidney specialist to a gynaecologist."

A diagnostic laparoscopy revealed Anna had endometriosis on her bladder, uterus, abdominal wall and fallopian tubes. The surgeon removed the scar tissue and she experienced a year of no pain or bladder issues. Unfortunately, when Anna and her husband started trying for children, they found they were unable to conceive and since then, they have tried IVF and other treatments including aromatherapy, acupuncture and dietary changes.

"Although my symptoms are ongoing, I am so much better than I was before diagnosis", she says.


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16:05:00

Emma Forbes is an English radio and television presenter.

Emma was diagnosed with endometriosis when her and her husband started trying for children. After having scans and laparoscopic surgery, her gynaecologist told her that she could never have children. She was put on to Clomid and within a year fell pregnant.

Since the birth of her daughter, Lily, in 1996, Emma has had 7 more laparoscopic surgeries.

After her son, Sam, was born in 1999, her endometriosis got even worse and she later had her ovary and fallopian tube removed.

She is said to control her endometriosis with a mixture of acupuncture and a healthy diet.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Emma Forbes


Emma Forbes is an English radio and television presenter.

Emma was diagnosed with endometriosis when her and her husband started trying for children. After having scans and laparoscopic surgery, her gynaecologist told her that she could never have children. She was put on to Clomid and within a year fell pregnant.

Since the birth of her daughter, Lily, in 1996, Emma has had 7 more laparoscopic surgeries.

After her son, Sam, was born in 1999, her endometriosis got even worse and she later had her ovary and fallopian tube removed.

She is said to control her endometriosis with a mixture of acupuncture and a healthy diet.


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16:05:00

Aya Matsuura is a Japanese singer and actress.

In a bid to raise awareness, Aya announced to her fans that she had endometriosis in 2011 and had been suffering with pain for the last 4 years. In 2009 she took a 3 year career break and now performs on a level suitable to her needs.

Aya has a daughter, born in 2014.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Aya Matsuura


Aya Matsuura is a Japanese singer and actress.

In a bid to raise awareness, Aya announced to her fans that she had endometriosis in 2011 and had been suffering with pain for the last 4 years. In 2009 she took a 3 year career break and now performs on a level suitable to her needs.

Aya has a daughter, born in 2014.


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16:04:00

Emma Bunton is an English singer, songwriter, actress, radio and television presenter.

Emma was diagnosed with endometriosis when she was 25 years old. "I remember the doctor saying at the time: 'Fifty per cent of women with endometriosis go on to have children'. I thought, only 50 per cent!? It scared the life out of me."

She has two sons, Beau, born in 2007 and Tate, born in 2011.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Emma Bunton


Emma Bunton is an English singer, songwriter, actress, radio and television presenter.

Emma was diagnosed with endometriosis when she was 25 years old. "I remember the doctor saying at the time: 'Fifty per cent of women with endometriosis go on to have children'. I thought, only 50 per cent!? It scared the life out of me."

She has two sons, Beau, born in 2007 and Tate, born in 2011.


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16:04:00

Hillary Clinton is an American politician, diplomat, lawyer, writer and public speaker.

She had trouble conceiving her only child, Chelsea, born in 1980, due to endometriosis.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Hillary Rodham Clinton


Hillary Clinton is an American politician, diplomat, lawyer, writer and public speaker.

She had trouble conceiving her only child, Chelsea, born in 1980, due to endometriosis.


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16:04:00

Tracey Emin, CBE, is an English artist.

Tracey collapsed after developing severe stomach pains and was rushed to hospital, where it was discovered she had endometriosis. She says "I couldn't walk because of the terrible pain in my hip from all the swelling.

Tracey revealed in 2012 that she had lost her libido after an operation for severe endometriosis brought on by the menopause. She said she does not have a sexual relationship with her partner and has never wished to have children.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Tracey Emin


Tracey Emin, CBE, is an English artist.

Tracey collapsed after developing severe stomach pains and was rushed to hospital, where it was discovered she had endometriosis. She says "I couldn't walk because of the terrible pain in my hip from all the swelling.

Tracey revealed in 2012 that she had lost her libido after an operation for severe endometriosis brought on by the menopause. She said she does not have a sexual relationship with her partner and has never wished to have children.


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16:04:00

Dolly Parton is an American singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer, actress, author, business woman and humanitarian, known primarily for her work in country music.

It was during a 35 date tour of the US and Canada in 1982, when she was 36, that she was taken in to hospital to have a partial hysterectomy due to endometriosis.

Dolly later faced a period of depression and suicidal thoughts from not being able to have children.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Dolly Parton


Dolly Parton is an American singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer, actress, author, business woman and humanitarian, known primarily for her work in country music.

It was during a 35 date tour of the US and Canada in 1982, when she was 36, that she was taken in to hospital to have a partial hysterectomy due to endometriosis.

Dolly later faced a period of depression and suicidal thoughts from not being able to have children.


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16:04:00

Nike Oshinowo is a Nigerian talk show host, entrepreneur and former pageant director.

Nike has battled with endometriosis since she was 13 years old. She says "The first time I experienced the pain of endometriosis was very traumatic. I thought I was going to die. Really, I have lost count of the number of surgeries that I have had but I sure know that it’s more than 17 times."

Nike is a mother of twins born via a surrogate.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Nike Oshinowo


Nike Oshinowo is a Nigerian talk show host, entrepreneur and former pageant director.

Nike has battled with endometriosis since she was 13 years old. She says "The first time I experienced the pain of endometriosis was very traumatic. I thought I was going to die. Really, I have lost count of the number of surgeries that I have had but I sure know that it’s more than 17 times."

Nike is a mother of twins born via a surrogate.


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16:04:00

Padma Lakshmi is an American author, actress, model and television host.

Padma had two ovarian cysts removed when she was 30 years old, but her doctor failed to inform her that she had endometriosis. In 2005, she was rushed to the hospital with severe abdominal cramps. She says "It turned out that some endometrial tissue had wrapped itself around my small intestine like a tourniquet. The gastroenterological surgeon who called this tissue 'scar tissue' said that he snipped it off and that I would be fine. Again, I was far from fine, and all of the symptoms I had came raging back with my next period."

At the age of 36, Padma was diagnosed with endometriosis which she had lived with the symptoms of since early adolescence. "I was told by my mother that this was just our lot in life, because I'm sure that's what she was told by her mother. So I expected the pain, I saw my mother go through it in fact, month in month out."

Padma co-founded the Endometriosis Foundation of America.

She gave birth to her daughter, Krishna, in 2010.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Padma Lakshmi


Padma Lakshmi is an American author, actress, model and television host.

Padma had two ovarian cysts removed when she was 30 years old, but her doctor failed to inform her that she had endometriosis. In 2005, she was rushed to the hospital with severe abdominal cramps. She says "It turned out that some endometrial tissue had wrapped itself around my small intestine like a tourniquet. The gastroenterological surgeon who called this tissue 'scar tissue' said that he snipped it off and that I would be fine. Again, I was far from fine, and all of the symptoms I had came raging back with my next period."

At the age of 36, Padma was diagnosed with endometriosis which she had lived with the symptoms of since early adolescence. "I was told by my mother that this was just our lot in life, because I'm sure that's what she was told by her mother. So I expected the pain, I saw my mother go through it in fact, month in month out."

Padma co-founded the Endometriosis Foundation of America.

She gave birth to her daughter, Krishna, in 2010.


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16:04:00

Karen Duffy is an American writer, model, television personality and actress.

She was diagnosed with endometriosis in 1998. She says ''For years, I smiled for the cameras and hid how I felt. I did what too many women do - wrote off my period pain as just part of being a woman. I thought I knew everything about being a female until I realised what I thought were regular monthly cramps, weren't regular at all. Finally, I took control of my monthly pain and had a serious talk with my doctor. And what that doctor found changed my life. It turned out my period wasn't the problem, endometriosis was.''

In 1995, Duffy was diagnosed with the disease neurosarcoidosis. Since then, she's written two books about her experience living with chronic pain.

Karen has one son, Jack, who was born via a surrogate in 2003.


Image courtesy of http://bit.ly/38cW1Yb

Celebrities with endometriosis: Karen Duffy


Karen Duffy is an American writer, model, television personality and actress.

She was diagnosed with endometriosis in 1998. She says ''For years, I smiled for the cameras and hid how I felt. I did what too many women do - wrote off my period pain as just part of being a woman. I thought I knew everything about being a female until I realised what I thought were regular monthly cramps, weren't regular at all. Finally, I took control of my monthly pain and had a serious talk with my doctor. And what that doctor found changed my life. It turned out my period wasn't the problem, endometriosis was.''

In 1995, Duffy was diagnosed with the disease neurosarcoidosis. Since then, she's written two books about her experience living with chronic pain.

Karen has one son, Jack, who was born via a surrogate in 2003.


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16:04:00

Anthea Turner is an English television presenter and media personality.

She has said the pain of endometriosis had been unbearable at times. "If someone was to give me a gun I would shoot myself, it really can get that bad."

Anthea has tried acupuncture in the past but was eventually told her endometriosis had cleared up spontaneously.

Anthea has said she has "had more IVF treatments than you can shake a stick at."


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Anthea Turner


Anthea Turner is an English television presenter and media personality.

She has said the pain of endometriosis had been unbearable at times. "If someone was to give me a gun I would shoot myself, it really can get that bad."

Anthea has tried acupuncture in the past but was eventually told her endometriosis had cleared up spontaneously.

Anthea has said she has "had more IVF treatments than you can shake a stick at."


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16:04:00

Whoopi Goldberg is an American comedian, actress, singer-songwriter, political activist, author and talk show host.

She found out she had endometriosis in the 70's and was given medication for the disease which worked.

Whoopi stated in 2009 "I had endometriosis 30 years ago maybe. I was very, very lucky. I had an intelligent doctor who sort of knew what was going on and said well, here take this stuff and he cleared it up. I was very lucky."

Whoopi has one daughter, Alexandria, born in 1973.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Whoopi Goldberg


Whoopi Goldberg is an American comedian, actress, singer-songwriter, political activist, author and talk show host.

She found out she had endometriosis in the 70's and was given medication for the disease which worked.

Whoopi stated in 2009 "I had endometriosis 30 years ago maybe. I was very, very lucky. I had an intelligent doctor who sort of knew what was going on and said well, here take this stuff and he cleared it up. I was very lucky."

Whoopi has one daughter, Alexandria, born in 1973.


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16:03:00

Annabel Croft is an English former professional tennis player and current radio and television presenter.

She had surgery for endometriosis in 1992.

After a doctor found a cyst on her ovary in 2003, Annabel visited a homeopath and found the cyst reduced in size after taking the prescribed remedies. She now visits her homeopath every 6 weeks for a "full MOT."

Annabel has 3 children.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Annabel Croft


Annabel Croft is an English former professional tennis player and current radio and television presenter.

She had surgery for endometriosis in 1992.

After a doctor found a cyst on her ovary in 2003, Annabel visited a homeopath and found the cyst reduced in size after taking the prescribed remedies. She now visits her homeopath every 6 weeks for a "full MOT."

Annabel has 3 children.


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16:03:00

Anna Friel is an English actress.

She was diagnosed with endometriosis when she was 28, after being rushed to hospital for emergency surgery and two blood transfusions for a ruptured ovarian cyst.

Anna says "One doctor told me it would be very hard if I left trying for a baby beyond the age of 30, which at the time was far from an ideal situation."

Anna gave birth to daughter, Gracie, in 2005.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Anna Friel


Anna Friel is an English actress.

She was diagnosed with endometriosis when she was 28, after being rushed to hospital for emergency surgery and two blood transfusions for a ruptured ovarian cyst.

Anna says "One doctor told me it would be very hard if I left trying for a baby beyond the age of 30, which at the time was far from an ideal situation."

Anna gave birth to daughter, Gracie, in 2005.


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16:03:00

Ellie Angel-Mobbs is an Australian radio presenter and ambassador for Endometriosis Australia.

She said "There is a strong family history of endometriosis in my family. My mother battled it so she made me aware of the disease when I started puberty. I suffered extreme pain for years to come with days off school and work huddled up in my bed crook as a dog. I was officially diagnosed with Stage IV endo in 2012 following a laparoscopy. Unfortunately, because it's so severe, the endo aggressively grew back".

She had further surgery for endometriosis in May 2014.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Ellie Angel-Mobbs


Ellie Angel-Mobbs is an Australian radio presenter and ambassador for Endometriosis Australia.

She said "There is a strong family history of endometriosis in my family. My mother battled it so she made me aware of the disease when I started puberty. I suffered extreme pain for years to come with days off school and work huddled up in my bed crook as a dog. I was officially diagnosed with Stage IV endo in 2012 following a laparoscopy. Unfortunately, because it's so severe, the endo aggressively grew back".

She had further surgery for endometriosis in May 2014.


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12:51:00

Peta-Jane Madam, known as PJ Madam, is an Australian reporter, producer, anchor and ambassador for Endometriosis Australia.

She has had two laparoscopies for endometriosis.

She said "I think the key though with endometriosis is that it's debilitating, it stops you in your tracks, you're unable to work, you're unable to do sport and leisure activities, it stops you having normal relationships, it really effects a lot of parts of your life".


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Peta-Jane Madam


Peta-Jane Madam, known as PJ Madam, is an Australian reporter, producer, anchor and ambassador for Endometriosis Australia.

She has had two laparoscopies for endometriosis.

She said "I think the key though with endometriosis is that it's debilitating, it stops you in your tracks, you're unable to work, you're unable to do sport and leisure activities, it stops you having normal relationships, it really effects a lot of parts of your life".


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12:27:00

Cynthia Koh, also known as Xu Mei Zhen 许美珍, is a Singaporean actress.

Cynthia was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2012, after having unusually long periods. Her gynaecologist revealed she had two blood cysts on her ovaries. Cynthia underwent keyhole surgery to remove these.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Cynthia Koh


Cynthia Koh, also known as Xu Mei Zhen 许美珍, is a Singaporean actress.

Cynthia was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2012, after having unusually long periods. Her gynaecologist revealed she had two blood cysts on her ovaries. Cynthia underwent keyhole surgery to remove these.


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12:13:00

Stephanie St. James is an American-born actress, singer and mentor.

Stephanie was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2003, after suffering with painful symptoms for over a decade.

Stephanie became an advocate for endometriosis after her 6th surgery.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Stephanie St. James


Stephanie St. James is an American-born actress, singer and mentor.

Stephanie was diagnosed with endometriosis in 2003, after suffering with painful symptoms for over a decade.

Stephanie became an advocate for endometriosis after her 6th surgery.


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11:56:00

Ada Nicodemou is an Australian actress.

Ada and her husband tried to conceive naturally for a year and when that didn't work they completed a single course of IVF treatment which was successful. Her son, Johnas, was born in 2012.

Ada has been open from the start of her journey and hoped that her story would help other couples struggling with fertility issues.


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Celebrities with endometriosis: Ada Nicodemou


Ada Nicodemou is an Australian actress.

Ada and her husband tried to conceive naturally for a year and when that didn't work they completed a single course of IVF treatment which was successful. Her son, Johnas, was born in 2012.

Ada has been open from the start of her journey and hoped that her story would help other couples struggling with fertility issues.


Image courtesy of https://bit.ly/2UBi3yI
11:41:00